The Family of James Panton, Town Crier(1805-1849)

This has been updated to include the outcome of the trial of Martin Luther Parkes, husband of Rebecca Frances Panton.

As is often the case with genealogical research, the task of researching John Panton born 1804 in Lincoln, has taken many twists and turns.My newspaper archive research, revealed early on that there was a James Panton, who was town crier(He was also a shoemaker by trade) in the Bail. Initially I had believed that John’s father James Panton(1786-1857) had been the town crier. However further research has proved to my satisfaction that John’s brother James Panton, was the town crier. James Panton the town crier, is described as having expired suddenly, having been cleaning out his pig sty. He had complained of feeling unwell and had died lying next to his wife in bed, aged only forty four.The death of James Panton, crier of the Bail would have made him born in 1805(from the Lincoln, Rutland and Stamford Mercury, 16th November, 1849.)

As he was born  in 1805, this indicated that he was the brother of John Panton born 1804. Today I have been researching James Panton(1805-1849)from Lincoln, son of James Panton(1786-1857) and his family.

Investigating each of his children in turn  has proven particularly fruitful and yielded yet another interesting court case. Rebecca Frances Panton(1843-1915), daughter of James Panton, the town crier had an eventful life.By 1881 Rebecca Frances Panton(referred to as Fanny) who is the second youngest daughter of James Panton, town crier, is living with her sister Sarah Panton and has clearly married somebody with the surname of Parks. Further research disclosed that Rebecca Frances(Fanny) Panton had married a young man, named Martin Luther Parks. This unusual name aroused my curiosity. A quick search of the newspaper archives revealed that Martin Luther Parks had been put on trial in September 1867, for having abandoned his wife and two children.Documents were produced to prove the marriage, however Martin Luther Parks had claimed he did not believe the marriage was valid, as he had been underage and had not had the permission of his parents. As revealed by later investigation, Martin Luther Parks’ father was a Methodist Minister called Robert Parks. He (Martin Luther Parks) was remanded in custody, as bail had not been paid. Later it was reported in The Nottingham and Stamford Mercury (September 13th, 1862) that the case had been discharged as he (Martin Luther Parks) had paid all expenses due and had undertaken to, “take his family off the books of the union”.

 Martin Luther Parks can be found in California in 1896, working as an engineer. Records note that he comes from England. 

By 1881 Rebecca Frances Panton and her children are living with her sister, Sarah Panton. Ten years later in 1891 Rebecca Frances Panton is described as the head of the household-by this time she has four children Robert, Eleanor(sadly Eleanor died in 1893, aged only eleven),  Florence and Lucy and her sister Sarah is now living with her. Unsure how she has managed to acquire two more children, although all the children bear the surname Parks. I note that Rebecca has retained the surname Parks.

Rebecca made straw bonnets and is living at 33 Bailgate according to the 1892 Kelly’s Directory.

Rebecca lived until she was ninety years old, despite the hardships she must have endured as a lone parent, dying and being buried in Lincoln in 1915.

 

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Lance Corporal John George Panton(1894-1915)

John George Panton, Great Great Grandson of James Panton(1785-1857). Great Grandson of James Panton, town crier of the Bail.(1805=1849). Grandson of George Panton(1821-1882) Son of John James Panton and Sophie Elizabeth Wholey

It appears Lance Corporal John George Panton took part in the Battle of Neuve Chappelle, (as part of the Lincolnshire Regiment) which took place in  10th to 13th March 1915, as he is buried in the British cemetery at Neuve Chappelle. He was reported as wounded and in hospital(6 Montpelier Square) in August 1915. He is subsequently  described as sick August 1915,  On September 18th 1915, it is reported he has influenza. He appears to have returned to the fighting having been discharged  from hospital and was subsequently killed 18th November 1915.

History of the World War-Neuve Chapelle by Francis Andrew March

poppy

The Family of James Panton, Town Crier(1805-1849)

As is often the case with genealogical research, the task of researching John Panton born 1804 in Lincoln, has taken many twists and turns.My newspaper archive research, revealed early on that there was a James Panton, who was town crier in the Bail. Initially I had believed that John’s father James Panton(1786-1857) had been the town crier.

However further research has proved to my satisfaction that John’s brother James Panton, was the town crier. James Panton the town crier, is described as having expired suddenly, having been cleaning out his pig sty. He had complained of feeling unwell and had died lying next to his wife in bed, aged only forty four.The death of James Panton, crier of the Bail would have made him born in 1805(from the Lincoln, Rutland and Stamford Mercury, 16th November, 1849.)

As he was born  in 1805, this indicated that he was the brother of John Panton born 1804. Today I have been researching James Panton(1805-1849)from Lincoln, son of James Panton(1786-1857) and his family.

Investigating each of his children in turn  has proven particularly fruitful and yielded yet another interesting court case. Rebecca Frances Panton(1843-1915), daughter of James Panton, the town crier had an eventful life.By 1881 Rebecca Frances Panton(referred to as Fanny) who is the second youngest daughter of James Panton, town crier, is living with her sister Sarah Panton and has clearly married somebody with the surname of Parks. Further research disclosed that Rebecca Frances(Fanny) Panton had married a young man, named Martin Luther Parks. This unusual name aroused my curiosity. A quick search of the newspaper archives revealed that Martin Luther Parks had been put on trial in September 1867, for having abandoned his wife and two children.Documents were produced to prove the marriage, however Martin Luther Parks had claimed he did not believe the marriage was valid, as he had been underage and had not had the permission of his parents. As revealed by later investigation, Martin Luther Parks’ father was a methodist minister called Robert Parks. Currently I have not discovered the final outcome of the trial, however I do know he was remanded in custody, as bail had not been paid.

*The Nottingham and Stamford Mercury reported on September  13th 1862 that the case was discharged, as he(Martin Luther Parks) paid all expenses due and undertook to “take his family off the books of the union.”

Interestingly a Martin Luther Parks of the right age can be found in California in 1896, working as an engineer. Records note that he comes from England. I am now fairly certain this is the former husband of Rebecca Frances Panton.

By 1881 Rebecca Frances Panton and her children are living with her sister, Sarah Panton. Ten years later in 1891 Rebecca Frances Panton is described as the head of the household-by this time she has four children Robert, Eleanor(sadly Eleanor died in 1893, aged only eleven),  Florence and Lucy and her sister Sarah is now living with her. Unsure how she has managed to acquire two more children, although all the children bear the surname Parks.

Rebecca made straw bonnets and is living at 33 Bailgate according to the 1892 Kelly’s Directory.

Rebecca lived until she was ninety years old, despite the hardships she must have endured as a lone parent, dying and being buried in Lincoln in 1915.

 

John Panton-His Story

John Panton was born to James Panton (a grocer’s porter born around 1786) in about 1804. He was christened at Saint Mary Magdalane’s Church in Lincoln on March  4th, 1804. John ‘s mother was called Rebecca and she was born in Kealby Lincolnshire in 1775(according to the 1851 census). James Panton died August 16th, 1857 in Lincoln aged 73. (Lincolnshire Chronicle, Northampton, Rutland and Nottingham Advertiser, August 31st,1857). The notice actually describes him as a grocer’s porter, which matches census information

At the current time I believe John had a sister Mary Ann born around 1806. At the moment the date of John’s marriage is unsure, as I feel I have insufficient evidence to confirm his wife, Mary’s surname. Mary and John are described as having nine children at the time of John’s trial in 1846. I believe these children were Ann(1829-), John(1831-), Robert(1835-), Susan(1837-1894), Rebecca(1839-), William(1841-), Sarah(1842-), Charlotte(1842-) and Frederick(.1845-)

Mary faced court in March 1845.Mary had thrown stones at another tallow chandler, Griffits Osler, when she had been caught scavenging round the yard of Mr Turner, the grocer (which was something she had apparently done before, as she was considered to be the reason why it was kept locked). She was tried on March 19th 1845. Regardless it appears to have been a time of hardship for the family which had resulted in Mary being fined and John being jailed for three months for theft from his employer Edward Scrivener.

The 1861 census finds John and Mary, with their children Robert, Rebecca and Fred still living at 52 Bail Gate in Lincoln. By this time John Panton is working as a labourer. They have also acquired a lodger John Shaw.

 

farmer

A Sum too Small for a Clever Mechanic..

Newspapers describe the theft from Edward Scrivener in great detail. It would seem it was not John Panton’s first such attempt.

Mr Scrivener had encountered John Panton leaving with a sack. Upon being questioned Panton told his employer that the sack contained only tallow croak.(I presume tallow croak would be the remnants from making the tallow candles).

How to make tallow

Edward Scrivener suspicions by now had been aroused, so he had then set a trap by driving a wooden peg into a piece of soap. The following day he  had searched his (John Panton’s) pockets and  had sent for William Tuxford, policeman. John Panton had immediately admitted the theft, stating that not only had he taken the soap(the soap with the wooden peg was found on his person) but that he had half a pound of candles in his pocket too.

Panton is described as having a wife and nine children(Interestingly I currently have only eight on my tree-Ann,John, Robert,Susan,Rebecca, Charlotte, Frederic and Henry). His wage is also mentioned as being sixteen shillings a week which the  newspaper considers  to be  “too small for a clever mechanic”.

As we know already, he received a sentence of three months for his crime.

 

Details from The Lincolnshire Chronicle, 27th March, 1846

“I try to stay in a state of confusion, just because of the expression it leaves on my face”. Johnny Depp

confusion (1)Edward Scrivener eventually sold his extensive property in 1858, at which point it is described as having been run as a successful business for more than fifty years.(Lincolnshire Chronicle, Friday 15 October, 1858).

I do know John Panton was still working as a tallow chandler in 1862, as that is how he describes himself on the wedding certificate of his daughter. I now realise he was unlikely to have been working for Edward Scrivener as the business had been sold by this point.

As I am taking you on a journey, I will describe my confusion over Panton addresses.

The John Panton with which my blog is concerned lived in 1851 at 52 Bail Gate.(interesting note that in 1944 Elizabeth and Arthur Lowe, occupied the property(Lincolnshire Echo, 24th April, 1944).

The period from 1862 until his apparent death in 1885 is currently blank however.

Now as I look at things again, I discover John(who by this time is describing himself as a retired farmer) and Mary Panton living with their son Henry. For some reason’ I had Henry born at two different dates, but 1845 fits perfectly..

In 1881 John Panton is living with his wife at Peel House, which appears to be some sort of hospital or charitable institution. His wife, Mary is giving her place of birth as Cammeringham. Cammeringham and Coleby where she described her birthplace in previous censuses are some 15 miles apart, still I have a new lead.Mary North took me in an interesting direction. There are several possible candidates born at around the right time. I have found a Mary North baptised in Goolceby in 1800(original document unavailable to check this spelling), a Mary North baptised in Coningsby in 1802 and a Mary North baptised in St Mary Magdalane, Lincoln, in 1803 which I initially strongly favoured, as so much Panton activity has taken place in and around that particular parish.

Now I am thoroughly confused as I notice I have actually attached at least two different 1851 census to her..

(I did say this was about the journey.)

I will now resort to what I believe we older people tend to do in these situations-hard copy.(This may take a while:))