Lives of World War One

One hundred years ago we were in the middle of WW1. My grandparents generation spoke of WW1 almost as if it were in the present. This is no longer recent history and nobody is left alive to recount the horrors from personal experience. The last surviving veteran of WW1 is believed to have been Florence Green(a nurse who died in 2012.)

Having heard of a great uncle who died on the fields of WW1 but whose body has never been recovered, I began a quest to discover more. My uncle fought in Mesopotamia. I knew the date of his death and his regiment and so I started my research from there. I found the war diaries of a member of his regiment(who had also died that day) and was able to glean from this and various newspapers accounts, much of the events from that fateful period in  January 1916.

The weather conditions had been horrendous. (There had been continuous torrential rain for days-the  muddy conditions the soldiers had experienced, were a nightmare.)  thus there had been open slaughter. The soldiers had frequently been unable  either to retrieve bodies or to help the injured, for some time. Many injured had died awaiting help, Hence it is probably unsurprising that my uncle had remained missing along with copious others.

The tragic events in Mesopotamia are described here  through recorded interviews with the army veterans who participated.

In October of 1916, the official account written by Sir Percy Lake ended with the following statement:

 

I cannot sufficiently express my admiration for the courage and dogged determination of the force engaged. For days they bivouacked in driving rain on soaked and sodden ground. Three times they were called upon to advance over a perfectly flat country, deep in mud, and absolutely devoid of cover, against well-constructed and well planned trenches, manned by a brave and stubborn enemy approximately their equal in numbers. They showed a spirit of endurance and self-sacrifice of which their country may well be proud.

 

I am in the process of identifying others in his regiment who died that same day and putting  together their stories also. I have done my best to ensure each one of them is remembered and have  attached my discoveries about the brave battle they fought.

It was to become one of Britain’s most humiliating defeats.. The suffering that was endured is almost unimaginable.  My uncle and others like him fought and  died thousands of miles away from home. I hope that in some small way,  to have helped honour their sacrifice..

 

 

Cross

 

Television interviews with WW1 veterans can be found here

If you wish to learn more about the battle in which my uncle and his regiment took part,  please feel free to use the contact form to request the information